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Comparative Arts & Letters Office of Digital Humanities Philosophy
Everyone’s got one, but what does it really mean to have an identity? Is identity something we choose or something we possess naturally? The answer is more complex than you might think.
Dive into 1800s Latter-day Saint women’s culture with a database of newspaper advertisements.
Would you find Galileo guilty of heresy? Would you put him to death? These are questions that students grappled with in their two-week mock trial for Philosophy 210 class.
Philosophy and the field of medicine have complementary roles in helping us ask difficult questions and propose workable solutions to today’s pressing concerns.
Eliza Wells teaches how Latter-day Saints will survive and thrive when they care about those around them.
Recent alumna Alyssa Baer shares her story and advice for students interested in the Digital Humanities program.
A recent historical photography exhibit invites you to consider how looking to the past can strengthen and inspire your life today.
As art museums shut down or limited their displays last spring, some looked for new ways to appreciate art while confined at home.
At BYU Education Week, Adjunct Faculty Jane G. Hinckley helped her audience rediscover Jane Austen’s “Mansfield Park” by looking into some of the factors that influenced the novel.
As part of an Education Week lecture series on finding Christ in the Humanities, Matthew Ancell helped his audience discover the hidden symbolism in Caravaggio's religious paintings.
Julia Flanders, a pioneer in the digitization of text and the creation of online corpora, addressed BYU and University of Utah professors and students regarding her work.
Three BYU Classical studies students placed in the annual Maurine Dallas Watkins Greek and Latin Translation contest. Two of those same students also received the Edward Phinney Book Prize for receiving a perfect score on the College Greek Exam.