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Comparative Arts & Letters English French & Italian
At the 2022 P. A. Christensen Lecture, Dr. Kristin Matthews analyzed the focus of contemporary Black American women’s poetry on historical archives and documents.
Walk the streets of Paris this winter without leaving Provo. (Sadly, no food or drinks allowed.)
BYU has so many wonderful alumni and emeriti who have served the community; it would be impossible to recognize everyone. But from time to time, we recognize a few individuals who have lived particularly exemplary lives of service, mentorship, and impact. Dave Wolverton (Farland) was such an individual—not just to the Latter-day Saint writing community but to any aspiring writer—and is worthy of mentioning as an example to us all.
Adjunct Professor Madeleine Dresden highlights common racist tropes and stereotypes in writing and offers solutions and alternatives for more diverse and inclusive writing for BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and People of Color) communities.
Collected creative works made by students at the Intermountain Indian School shed new light on a dark past.
A recent historical photography exhibit invites you to consider how looking to the past can strengthen and inspire your life today.
As art museums shut down or limited their displays last spring, some looked for new ways to appreciate art while confined at home.
Do you need poetic inspiration? Try gathering from the symphony of life to create the perfect audio experience.
At BYU Education Week, Adjunct Faculty Jane G. Hinckley helped her audience rediscover Jane Austen’s “Mansfield Park” by looking into some of the factors that influenced the novel.
As part of an Education Week lecture series on finding Christ in the Humanities, Matthew Ancell helped his audience discover the hidden symbolism in Caravaggio's religious paintings.
The conversation about racial diversity and inclusion at BYU has grown increasingly urgent since the events of Charlottesville in 2017, and the continuing pattern of racial oppression and injustice has brought these issues to the forefront of national attention.
Martine Leavitt crawled into her characters’ skins, journeyed to other worlds, and let the Spirit guide—becoming an award-winning author along the way.