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Center for Language Studies French & Italian Humanities News
Congratulations to Associate Dean Corry Cropper and Associate Professor Christopher Flood (French & Italian) for receiving the Mormon History Association (MHA) 2021 Best Book on International Mormon History award for their collaborative publication, Mormons in Paris: Polygamy on the French Stage.
Most students have no idea what to expect when they hear “translation and localization,” let alone the numerous career options that are available for those who follow this relatively new minor.
How ASL Students and Professors Have Dealt with COVID-19 Restrictions
French literature professor Marc Olivier made a splash with his book "Household Horror: Cinematic Fear and the Secret Life of Everyday Objects," landing him a series editor position for a new series, Icons of Horror.
BYU is rapidly expanding the translation and localization minor, a program that will have lasting impacts on the lives of people around the world.
Professors Corry Cropper and Chris Flood recently published their book "Mormons in Paris" as an analysis of how the French used early Mormon polygamy to satirize French culture in the 1800s.
Biking over two hundred miles pushes the human mind and body to its limits, but so does trying to learn a new language. Associate Professor Troy Cox (Linguistics) has experience with both.
BYU students have found creative ways to use their mission languages in professional settings, even though some of these languages are isolated to a single area in the world.
With so many missionaries who have come home early due to COVID-19, the Center for Language Studies has had its work cut out to accommodate so many students.
Partnered with ACTFL, the Center of Language Studies works to promote language learning worldwide.
Albert Camus’ novel depicts the city of Oran, Algeria during a contemporary outbreak of the plague. While there are obvious parallels between the plague in the novel and the peste brune (the brown plague, a nickname for the Nazis who occupied France during World War 2), by transforming the threat into an act of nature, Camus shifts the focus from human cruelty to the many reactions to suffering: some pretend it doesn’t exist, some try to escape it, others accept it and try to alleviate pain.
Associate Professor Jennifer Haraguchi (Italian) speaks about the role of the plague in Boccaccio’s Decameron and his unique prescription for a cure: storytelling.