Skip to main content

College News

169 results found
Cinema Humanities News Literature
BYU’s Marlene Hansen Esplin, Assistant Professor of Interdisciplinary Humanities, shares how the study of problems of translation can lead to greater social consciousness. 
Associate Professor Greg Stallings (Spanish & Portuguese) may have thought that picking The Exterminating Angel to be shown at the International Cinema seemed random, but the theme of quarantine that runs throughout the movie has become especially poignant in today’s environment.
Dr. Jane Hinckley, Department of Comparative Arts & Letters, discusses Lady Mary Wortley Montagu.
BYU College of Humanities Language Assessment Coordinator Dave Nielsen received the Patriot award from the United States Department of Defense on February 4, 2022. The award is presented to employers and supervisors nominated by Service members of the National Guard Reserve for going above and beyond to directly support the employed Service member and their family.
The writings of silenced women are being recovered and magnified by Drs. Halling and Hegstrom in a remarkable new database.
BYU has so many wonderful alumni and emeriti who have served the community; it would be impossible to recognize everyone. But from time to time, we recognize a few individuals who have lived particularly exemplary lives of service, mentorship, and impact. Dave Wolverton (Farland) was such an individual—not just to the Latter-day Saint writing community but to any aspiring writer—and is worthy of mentioning as an example to us all.
Albert Camus’ novel depicts the city of Oran, Algeria during a contemporary outbreak of the plague. While there are obvious parallels between the plague in the novel and the peste brune (the brown plague, a nickname for the Nazis who occupied France during World War 2), by transforming the threat into an act of nature, Camus shifts the focus from human cruelty to the many reactions to suffering: some pretend it doesn’t exist, some try to escape it, others accept it and try to alleviate pain.
Explore new directors, cultures, and themes this semester with International Cinema.
Illness has been recorded in art for much of human history. In the fall of 2017, my colleague Brian Poole and I co-taught an Honors 220: Unexpected Connections course we titled “Literature and Disease.” The class was Brian’s idea. He’s a microbiologist in the College of Life Sciences, a virologist, and an expert on the human immune system.
Would you find Galileo guilty of heresy? Would you put him to death? These are questions that students grappled with in their two-week mock trial for Philosophy 210 class.
Philosophy and the field of medicine have complementary roles in helping us ask difficult questions and propose workable solutions to today’s pressing concerns.
Associate Professor Mike Pope (Comparative Arts and Letters) discusses plagues in Classical literature and how epidemics were used as a literary convention.