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English Humanities News
Joe Darowski argues that pop culture can have as much literary value as traditional canon.
BYU’s Young Adult Novelist Conference (YANCON) introduces aspiring student novelists to published authors and professional writing techniques.
Barbara Newman gives annual Nan Osmond Grass Lecture on the meaning of the book of Revelation in the Bible.
Jesse Richmond’s Chifir becomes Juried Winner in the Short Fiction Category and is being published by Short Edition along with Kath Richard’s The Widow Interim and Braden Robinson’s roses.
You don’t have to choose just one.
At the 2022 P. A. Christensen Lecture, Dr. Kristin Matthews analyzed the focus of contemporary Black American women’s poetry on historical archives and documents.
BYU has so many wonderful alumni and emeriti who have served the community; it would be impossible to recognize everyone. But from time to time, we recognize a few individuals who have lived particularly exemplary lives of service, mentorship, and impact. Dave Wolverton (Farland) was such an individual—not just to the Latter-day Saint writing community but to any aspiring writer—and is worthy of mentioning as an example to us all.
Adjunct Professor Madeleine Dresden highlights common racist tropes and stereotypes in writing and offers solutions and alternatives for more diverse and inclusive writing for BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and People of Color) communities.
Do you need poetic inspiration? Try gathering from the symphony of life to create the perfect audio experience.
The conversation about racial diversity and inclusion at BYU has grown increasingly urgent since the events of Charlottesville in 2017, and the continuing pattern of racial oppression and injustice has brought these issues to the forefront of national attention.
Martine Leavitt crawled into her characters’ skins, journeyed to other worlds, and let the Spirit guide—becoming an award-winning author along the way.
Art and writing are means of self-expression. They provide an outlet to escape into another world, especially when the real world is full of chaos and cacophony. Some have become so removed from the world that they become known as “reclusive artists.”