Skip to main content

College News

32 results found
Asian & Near Eastern Languages Center for Language Studies Office of Digital Humanities Foreign Language Humanities News
Recent alumna Alyssa Baer shares her story and advice for students interested in the Digital Humanities program.
Dean of the College of Humanities, J. Scott Miller, has appointed Richard McBride as chair of the BYU Department of Asian & Near Eastern Languages. McBride succeeds Dana Bourgerie, who has been serving as department chair since June 2015. “Dana has led the department in word and deed," remarked Dean Miller. "He has been encouraging and supportive of faculty development and curriculum
Most students have no idea what to expect when they hear “translation and localization,” let alone the numerous career options that are available for those who follow this relatively new minor.
How ASL Students and Professors Have Dealt with COVID-19 Restrictions
BYU is rapidly expanding the translation and localization minor, a program that will have lasting impacts on the lives of people around the world.
Julia Flanders, a pioneer in the digitization of text and the creation of online corpora, addressed BYU and University of Utah professors and students regarding her work.
Julie Damron (Asian and Near Eastern Languages) established a direct enrollment program between BYU and a university in Suwon, Korea—KHU. Her work has recently earned national acclaim.
Biking over two hundred miles pushes the human mind and body to its limits, but so does trying to learn a new language. Associate Professor Troy Cox (Linguistics) has experience with both.
BYU students have found creative ways to use their mission languages in professional settings, even though some of these languages are isolated to a single area in the world.
With so many missionaries who have come home early due to COVID-19, the Center for Language Studies has had its work cut out to accommodate so many students.
Partnered with ACTFL, the Center of Language Studies works to promote language learning worldwide.
As a child in Cambodia in the 1970s, nine-year-old Chab Chheang, nicknamed “Nike” for his love of the shoes, crossed the border into Thailand with his family. But instead of finding safety, Nike’s starving parents were greeted by farmers who presented an excruciating choice: a bag of rice in exchange for their son.