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Center for Language Studies English French & Italian Language Learning Literature
How ASL Students and Professors Have Dealt with COVID-19 Restrictions
Partnered with ACTFL, the Center of Language Studies works to promote language learning worldwide.
With increasing interest in writing young adult literature, BYU graduate students strive to help undergraduate students find the literary resources and connections they need to be successful.
Associate Professor Paul Westover and students enrolled in his Fall 2019 Romantic literature course curated exhibits to honor the memory of the English poet William Wordsworth and his sister, diarist Dorothy Wordsworth.
Albert Camus’ novel depicts the city of Oran, Algeria during a contemporary outbreak of the plague. While there are obvious parallels between the plague in the novel and the peste brune (the brown plague, a nickname for the Nazis who occupied France during World War 2), by transforming the threat into an act of nature, Camus shifts the focus from human cruelty to the many reactions to suffering: some pretend it doesn’t exist, some try to escape it, others accept it and try to alleviate pain.
Professor Jane Hinckley presented on one of Jane Austen’s famous novels Emma to inspire audiences to form a deeper relationship with the text.
Illness has been recorded in art for much of human history. In the fall of 2017, my colleague Brian Poole and I co-taught an Honors 220: Unexpected Connections course we titled “Literature and Disease.” The class was Brian’s idea. He’s a microbiologist in the College of Life Sciences, a virologist, and an expert on the human immune system.
How can poetry, plays, and art flourish during a deadly pandemic? Learn how Shakespeare used the time of plagues to spur his creativity!
Associate Dean Leslee Thorne-Murphy lectured during Education Week 2019 on Victorian Christmas literature and how authors focused on Christ despite the rise of commercialization.
2014 James Barker award winner Gregory Clark, associate dean and English professor in BYU’s College of Humanities, explains how language strives to express experience and how jazz music exemplifies a possible solution when words fail.