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Foreign Language Humanities News Literature
BYU has so many wonderful alumni and emeriti who have served the community; it would be impossible to recognize everyone. But from time to time, we recognize a few individuals who have lived particularly exemplary lives of service, mentorship, and impact. Dave Wolverton (Farland) was such an individual—not just to the Latter-day Saint writing community but to any aspiring writer—and is worthy of mentioning as an example to us all.
Associate Professor Paul Westover and students enrolled in his Fall 2019 Romantic literature course curated exhibits to honor the memory of the English poet William Wordsworth and his sister, diarist Dorothy Wordsworth.
Explore new directors, cultures, and themes this semester with International Cinema.
BYU Professor Kerry Soper speaks on the famous comic series The Far Side and the life of its creator, Gary Larson.
Professor Jane Hinckley presented on one of Jane Austen’s famous novels Emma to inspire audiences to form a deeper relationship with the text.
BYU’s Marlene Hansen Esplin, Assistant Professor of Interdisciplinary Humanities, shares how the study of problems of translation can lead to greater social consciousness. 
Dr. Jane Hinckley, Department of Comparative Arts & Letters, discusses Lady Mary Wortley Montagu.
Would you find Galileo guilty of heresy? Would you put him to death? These are questions that students grappled with in their two-week mock trial for Philosophy 210 class.
Philosophy and the field of medicine have complementary roles in helping us ask difficult questions and propose workable solutions to today’s pressing concerns.
Are you struggling with productivity and time management? Try these six suggestions to get focused.
Adjunct Professor Madeleine Dresden highlights common racist tropes and stereotypes in writing and offers solutions and alternatives for more diverse and inclusive writing for BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and People of Color) communities.
Albert Camus’ novel depicts the city of Oran, Algeria during a contemporary outbreak of the plague. While there are obvious parallels between the plague in the novel and the peste brune (the brown plague, a nickname for the Nazis who occupied France during World War 2), by transforming the threat into an act of nature, Camus shifts the focus from human cruelty to the many reactions to suffering: some pretend it doesn’t exist, some try to escape it, others accept it and try to alleviate pain.