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At BYU Education Week, Adjunct Faculty Jane G. Hinckley helped her audience rediscover Jane Austen’s “Mansfield Park” by looking into some of the factors that influenced the novel.
As part of an Education Week lecture series on finding Christ in the Humanities, Matthew Ancell helped his audience discover the hidden symbolism in Caravaggio's religious paintings.
Dr. George B. Handley of the Comparative Arts & Letters Department recently published his 11th book, If Truth Were a Child (2019). Unlike his previous titles—which include creative non-fiction, scholarly works, a memoir, and a novel—this book is a compilation of reflective essays analyzing the intersection between faith and intellectualism.
Three BYU Classical studies students placed in the annual Maurine Dallas Watkins Greek and Latin Translation contest. Two of those same students also received the Edward Phinney Book Prize for receiving a perfect score on the College Greek Exam.
Professor Daniel Peterson (Asian and Near Eastern Languages) is wrapping up his time at BYU, but his work continues as "Witnesses" hits theaters.
Dean of the College of Humanities, J. Scott Miller, has appointed Richard McBride as chair of the BYU Department of Asian & Near Eastern Languages. McBride succeeds Dana Bourgerie, who has been serving as department chair since June 2015. “Dana has led the department in word and deed," remarked Dean Miller. "He has been encouraging and supportive of faculty development and curriculum
Professor Carl Sederholm (Comparative Arts & Letters) was recently given an award of appreciation from the division of Continuing Education for his supportive role with the BYU Salt Lake Center. His assistance with and interest in the Salt Lake Center and continuing education helped distinguish him as the proud recipient of this award.
Julie Damron (Asian and Near Eastern Languages) established a direct enrollment program between BYU and a university in Suwon, Korea—KHU. Her work has recently earned national acclaim.
PROVO, Utah (November 23, 2020)—Mirrors, lights, and of course, the famous polka dots. The work of 91-year-old Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama has inspired millions to break away from the norms of art and society, and to embrace the person within.
With so many missionaries who have come home early due to COVID-19, the Center for Language Studies has had its work cut out to accommodate so many students.
As a child in Cambodia in the 1970s, nine-year-old Chab Chheang, nicknamed “Nike” for his love of the shoes, crossed the border into Thailand with his family. But instead of finding safety, Nike’s starving parents were greeted by farmers who presented an excruciating choice: a bag of rice in exchange for their son.
Modern lessons we can learn from 13th century Japanese recluses