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Comparative Arts & Letters French & Italian Philosophy Humanities News
The Department of Philosophy has named Professor David Jensen as associate chair to Professor David Laraway, the current chair of the department. Jensen served previously as the associate chair of the department with the last department chair as well. In this associate chair position, Jensen will assist Laraway in governing and administrative efforts of the department.
French literature professor Marc Olivier made a splash with his book "Household Horror: Cinematic Fear and the Secret Life of Everyday Objects," landing him a series editor position for a new series, Icons of Horror.
For the BYU Philosophy Club, many of today's most pressing issues can be understood through reasoned discussion.
Professors Corry Cropper and Chris Flood recently published their book "Mormons in Paris" as an analysis of how the French used early Mormon polygamy to satirize French culture in the 1800s.
Professor Carl Sederholm (Comparative Arts & Letters) was recently given an award of appreciation from the division of Continuing Education for his supportive role with the BYU Salt Lake Center. His assistance with and interest in the Salt Lake Center and continuing education helped distinguish him as the proud recipient of this award.
PROVO, Utah (November 23, 2020)—Mirrors, lights, and of course, the famous polka dots. The work of 91-year-old Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama has inspired millions to break away from the norms of art and society, and to embrace the person within.
BYU Professor Kerry Soper speaks on the famous comic series The Far Side and the life of its creator, Gary Larson.
BYU’s Marlene Hansen Esplin, Assistant Professor of Interdisciplinary Humanities, shares how the study of problems of translation can lead to greater social consciousness. 
Albert Camus’ novel depicts the city of Oran, Algeria during a contemporary outbreak of the plague. While there are obvious parallels between the plague in the novel and the peste brune (the brown plague, a nickname for the Nazis who occupied France during World War 2), by transforming the threat into an act of nature, Camus shifts the focus from human cruelty to the many reactions to suffering: some pretend it doesn’t exist, some try to escape it, others accept it and try to alleviate pain.
Associate Professor Jennifer Haraguchi (Italian) speaks about the role of the plague in Boccaccio’s Decameron and his unique prescription for a cure: storytelling.
As we all spend time in isolation, Associate Professor of French Bob Hudson reflects on how the Heptaméron provides us with a model for reflecting upon and challenging ideologies and social conventions during this period of quarantine.
Collected creative works made by students at the Intermountain Indian School shed new light on a dark past.