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Professor Daniel Peterson (Asian and Near Eastern Languages) is wrapping up his time at BYU, but his work continues as "Witnesses" hits theaters.
Dean of the College of Humanities, J. Scott Miller, has appointed Richard McBride as chair of the BYU Department of Asian & Near Eastern Languages. McBride succeeds Dana Bourgerie, who has been serving as department chair since June 2015. “Dana has led the department in word and deed," remarked Dean Miller. "He has been encouraging and supportive of faculty development and curriculum
French literature professor Marc Olivier made a splash with his book "Household Horror: Cinematic Fear and the Secret Life of Everyday Objects," landing him a series editor position for a new series, Icons of Horror.
Professors Corry Cropper and Chris Flood recently published their book "Mormons in Paris" as an analysis of how the French used early Mormon polygamy to satirize French culture in the 1800s.
Julie Damron (Asian and Near Eastern Languages) established a direct enrollment program between BYU and a university in Suwon, Korea—KHU. Her work has recently earned national acclaim.
With so many missionaries who have come home early due to COVID-19, the Center for Language Studies has had its work cut out to accommodate so many students.
Albert Camus’ novel depicts the city of Oran, Algeria during a contemporary outbreak of the plague. While there are obvious parallels between the plague in the novel and the peste brune (the brown plague, a nickname for the Nazis who occupied France during World War 2), by transforming the threat into an act of nature, Camus shifts the focus from human cruelty to the many reactions to suffering: some pretend it doesn’t exist, some try to escape it, others accept it and try to alleviate pain.
This year, Dr. John Rosenberg received the UFLA Friend of the Profession award, which is given to individuals who have advanced the study of world languages in Utah.
Associate Professor Jennifer Haraguchi (Italian) speaks about the role of the plague in Boccaccio’s Decameron and his unique prescription for a cure: storytelling.
As we all spend time in isolation, Associate Professor of French Bob Hudson reflects on how the Heptaméron provides us with a model for reflecting upon and challenging ideologies and social conventions during this period of quarantine.
As a child in Cambodia in the 1970s, nine-year-old Chab Chheang, nicknamed “Nike” for his love of the shoes, crossed the border into Thailand with his family. But instead of finding safety, Nike’s starving parents were greeted by farmers who presented an excruciating choice: a bag of rice in exchange for their son.
Modern lessons we can learn from 13th century Japanese recluses