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Comparative Arts & Letters French & Italian Philosophy Humanities News Literature
Charles Oughton’s unusual teaching method leads to victory.
Everyone’s got one, but what does it really mean to have an identity? Is identity something we choose or something we possess naturally? The answer is more complex than you might think.
Would you find Galileo guilty of heresy? Would you put him to death? These are questions that students grappled with in their two-week mock trial for Philosophy 210 class.
Philosophy and the field of medicine have complementary roles in helping us ask difficult questions and propose workable solutions to today’s pressing concerns.
Walk the streets of Paris this winter without leaving Provo. (Sadly, no food or drinks allowed.)
BYU Professor Kerry Soper speaks on the famous comic series The Far Side and the life of its creator, Gary Larson.
BYU’s Marlene Hansen Esplin, Assistant Professor of Interdisciplinary Humanities, shares how the study of problems of translation can lead to greater social consciousness. 
Albert Camus’ novel depicts the city of Oran, Algeria during a contemporary outbreak of the plague. While there are obvious parallels between the plague in the novel and the peste brune (the brown plague, a nickname for the Nazis who occupied France during World War 2), by transforming the threat into an act of nature, Camus shifts the focus from human cruelty to the many reactions to suffering: some pretend it doesn’t exist, some try to escape it, others accept it and try to alleviate pain.
Greek myths have been told time and again, but Professor Roger Macfarlane explores how these myths have been adapted to our modern culture.
Eliza Wells teaches how Latter-day Saints will survive and thrive when they care about those around them.
A recent historical photography exhibit invites you to consider how looking to the past can strengthen and inspire your life today.
Dr. George B. Handley of the Comparative Arts & Letters Department recently published his 11th book, If Truth Were a Child (2019). Unlike his previous titles—which include creative non-fiction, scholarly works, a memoir, and a novel—this book is a compilation of reflective essays analyzing the intersection between faith and intellectualism.