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French & Italian German & Russian Humanities News Literature
IC explores unique films on cultural convergence.
Explore 19th-century French stereotypes of Mormonism.
James Tissot experimented with painting uncommon biblical scenes that create rich resonance.
Four BYU students pay their respects to American soldiers who died defending France.
Award winning author Kossi Komla-Ebri describes the prevalence—and effects—of racism in Italy.
Albert Camus’ novel depicts the city of Oran, Algeria during a contemporary outbreak of the plague. While there are obvious parallels between the plague in the novel and the peste brune (the brown plague, a nickname for the Nazis who occupied France during World War 2), by transforming the threat into an act of nature, Camus shifts the focus from human cruelty to the many reactions to suffering: some pretend it doesn’t exist, some try to escape it, others accept it and try to alleviate pain.
Walk the streets of Paris this winter without leaving Provo. (Sadly, no food or drinks allowed.)
Undercover political fairytales, frustrated peace promoters, and an Enoch-type island utopia fill the minds of those who attended the 2021 P.A. Christensen Lecture.  
Congratulations to Associate Dean Corry Cropper and Associate Professor Christopher Flood (French & Italian) for receiving the Mormon History Association (MHA) 2021 Best Book on International Mormon History award for their collaborative publication, Mormons in Paris: Polygamy on the French Stage.
French literature professor Marc Olivier made a splash with his book "Household Horror: Cinematic Fear and the Secret Life of Everyday Objects," landing him a series editor position for a new series, Icons of Horror.
Professors Corry Cropper and Chris Flood recently published their book "Mormons in Paris" as an analysis of how the French used early Mormon polygamy to satirize French culture in the 1800s.
Associate Professor Jennifer Haraguchi (Italian) speaks about the role of the plague in Boccaccio’s Decameron and his unique prescription for a cure: storytelling.