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French & Italian Philosophy Humanities News Literature
Effective this summer, several new faculty have assumed leadership positions in the College of Humanities.
A philosophy conference honors Daniel Graham, professor emeritus and eminent scholar of pre-Socratic philosophy.
Explore 19th-century French stereotypes of Mormonism.
Alumnus Dave Elkington shares how humanities students are needed in the business world.
James Tissot experimented with painting uncommon biblical scenes that create rich resonance.
IC explores unique films on cultural convergence.
A new conference hosted by BYU Philosophy, Nursing, and the Sorensen Center tackles the toughest questions in medical ethics.
Four BYU students pay their respects to American soldiers who died defending France.
Award winning author Kossi Komla-Ebri describes the prevalence—and effects—of racism in Italy.
Everyone’s got one, but what does it really mean to have an identity? Is identity something we choose or something we possess naturally? The answer is more complex than you might think.
Albert Camus’ novel depicts the city of Oran, Algeria during a contemporary outbreak of the plague. While there are obvious parallels between the plague in the novel and the peste brune (the brown plague, a nickname for the Nazis who occupied France during World War 2), by transforming the threat into an act of nature, Camus shifts the focus from human cruelty to the many reactions to suffering: some pretend it doesn’t exist, some try to escape it, others accept it and try to alleviate pain.
Would you find Galileo guilty of heresy? Would you put him to death? These are questions that students grappled with in their two-week mock trial for Philosophy 210 class.